Estate Plan Questionnaire

You can download my very brief estate plan questionnaire from this page. This will help start the thinking process for choosing who will help you manage your affairs.

Please click on the button below to download and print.

To make an appointment with Karrie, please call the office at (760) 223-6026. Our office manager, Rhonda, will be happy to schedule an appointment with you.

COVID-19 UPDATES

Please follow my Facebook page for more up to the minute updates concerning our office and how the closures of some government offices may impact you/us. https://www.facebook.com/karrie.bunting/

The Court system of Kern County is running on bare bones during this time. They have extended the time frame past the end of March to April 10th. I’m sure they will update as they go along, making adjustments where necessary.

Please see the official notice as of March 24, 2020 below.

What if I have a case in court?

You can look for your case HERE.

Enter your last name, first name (LAST NAME COMMA FIRST NAME), or enter you case number. You will find all the information you need.

I had a hearing scheduled for April 15, and when I went to verify, it has been rescheduled, but no future date has been assigned. Our already impacted probate department case schedule is not helped at all by this public crisis, so I anticipate having to wait even longer for hearing dates this year. The norm for last year on a final petition was 4-5 months. I am guessing it will be closer to 6 months at the soonest now that there has been a massive delay in hearings.

It is what it is, and we will still be working behind the scenes during this time to move forward what we can move forward. We anticipate being able to meet with clients again April 15, but will keep an eye on public health and government suggestions. At that time, we may have to open on a limited basis to allow disinfecting of the office between clients.

As a reminder, our office is closed to the public until that time. Please stay home as much as possible so we can all get back to work as soon as possible. If you would like to make an appointment, please call and leave a message. We will check the phones twice a week and make phone calls back as needed.

Holiday Closure…

Our office will be closed for two weeks during the holiday season. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause…but we will be back in the office on Tuesday, January 07, 2020. You can always call and leave a message and we will get back to you then.

Holiday Schedule Updates

The holiday season is coming up, and I wanted to let you know when the office will be closed so that we can all plan accordingly.

October: Normal business hours and days.

November: We will be closed from Friday the 22nd through December 02, opening again on Tuesday, December 03.

December: We will be closed Friday the 20th through Wednesday, January 01, returning on Thursday, January 02, 2020.

What is Conservatorship, and How Do I Avoid it?

Conservatorship is a court process wherein someone is granted permission to take care of another adult. This can be in the form of a limited conservatorship, which covers those persons over the age of 18, but who have mental disabilities that do not allow them to sign paperwork, or it could be a general conservatorship which covers adults who have lost the capacity to care for themselves either physically or financially.

Conservatorships are costly and time consuming. And of course, it means the court is in your family business, watching everything that happens to you. There are the initial hearings and paperwork, and then there are yearly accountings if your estate is involved. A bond is required for the person who is asking to be appointed to care for you.

How Can a Conservatorship Be Avoided?

Avoiding a conservatorship is fairly easy. A person needs to correctly fill out a Durable Power of Attorney form and an Advanced Healthcare form. I do not provide a link to the many free forms available online because I don’t want to be biased. In your searching, just make sure it is written for California. (Please understand this does not apply to a limited conservatorship. You must have capacity in order to sign documents. That is a complicated area of law. Please consult an attorney on whether or not a limited conservatorship might be right in your situation.)

Also, if you fill these forms out incorrectly, you will still be looking at the inside of a courtroom to fix them later. When you do anything yourself, whether it is fixing a leaky sink or your own legal work, it is important to know what you are doing and to do it right the first time. Doing it incorrectly could lead to a more expensive and time consuming problem later.

Hours and Location Update

My office is located at 5104 Lake Isabella Blvd, Suite B., Lake Isabella, CA. I serve the Kern River Valley area. I also serve Ridgecrest, CA on a limited basis, but that availability will open more in January/February 2020. I can only meet by appointments at this time…please no drop ins as my current office does not have a waiting area.

At this time, I am closed on Mondays, and Fridays are a limited work day due parts of my job requiring me to go to Bakersfield to drop off and pick up court and recorder’s office related paperwork.

You might need probate if…

  • someone you love has passed away and their real property is sitting there, unable to be sold, unable to be transfered.
  • someone you love has passed away and they have assets in their bank accounts, or stock accounts, and they won’t release the funds.

What You Need to Know First

There are TWO things you need to do first. Now that I say that, let’s make it THREE things. These steps aren’t very hard.

1.) Make a list of the property left behind.

2.) Determine if any of the property on the list transfers straight to anyone else because they are a named beneficiary, or joint owner. These things do not need probate at all.

3.) Look at what is left on the list. These are the things that might need probate.

Next Steps

  • If there is an account or personal property that is worth less than $166,250.00, then a small estate affidavit can be used. (Probate Code 13100) You can find a sample form HERE for free.
  • If there is personal property worth more than $166,250.00, then it has to go through probate court.
  • If there is real property at all…it will require some kind of probate. If the property is worth $55,425 or less, a simplified process can be done. The filing fee is $45 with the court. The form for this can be found HERE. Please note, you have to have the property appraised by the probate referee first. In Kern County, his name is Michael Burger.
  • If there is real property that is worth between $55,425-$166,250.00, another “simplified” process can be used. This one requires a hearing, and the filing fee is $435. You can find the paperwork for this HERE.
  • If there is real property that is worth more than $166,250.00…then you must go through a full probate. That is the most complex of the three processes.

Also, please keep in mind, that in some cases, even if the house is worth less than $166,250 and it qualifies for a more simplified process, the situation may require the oversight of the court for the protection of the heirs. Also, while there are “simplified” processes, these are not always easy. Take a look at your options yourself, first. You may decide to call an attorney to handle the paperwork for you.

I am happy to help clients in the Kern Valley, Ridgecrest, and Bakersfield areas handle their non-litigation probate matters. My office is located in Lake Isabella, but I work with clients from all over, utilizing technology to get things done as efficiently as possible.

Book Recommendation: Estate Planning for the Sandwich Generation

Note: I receive no money, or any other type of gift from posting about this book.

I have a book recommendation for ANYONE who is wondering about where to begin for their personal estate planning, or for a loved ones future plans. 

Earlier this year, I was asked to review, preview, and give feedback on a book written by a fellow attorney. Catherine Hodder, Esq. reached out to me and interviewed me for her website back in April/May of 2017. You can read that HERE. I have never met with Catherine in person, or even talked to her over the phone. But, I like her. She’s smart. I know this because she wrote a very informative, accurate, and easy to read book about a topic that most people don’t understand.  She did an excellent job of breaking down the “legal stuff” and wrote a book about Estate Planning that 1.) does not put you to sleep; 2.) is written for everyday people, not lawyers; and 3.) is extremely well written, and targets those people who have aging parents and growing kids. 

“Estate Planning for the Sandwich Generation: How to Help Your Parents and Protect Your Kids” is a book I wish I had had the time to write. But, now I don’t have to worry about writing a book because Catherine captured everything I wish my current and future clients knew. 

If you are interested in a copy of the book, you can find it on Amazon, or by clicking the following link: Estate Planning for the Sandwich Generation.

Also, I received a shout out in the Acknowledgments. 


I highly recommend this book to anyone who is thinking about wills, revocable living trusts, powers of attorneys, advanced healthcare directives, etc. 

Medi-Cal Qualifications: what do I need to know?

There is a lot of misinformation about qualifying for Medi-Cal for long term care help. Many people hear, “You can only have $2000. Get rid of the rest.”

Also, many people think you can hide assets from Medi-Cal. It has been my personal experience that they know everything. You can’t hide your cash or your financial history from them.

The truth is, spending down your assets is not that simple. Medi-Cal categorizes your assets into countable and non-countable assets. Non-countable assets are sometimes called exempt assets.

For example, you can own a home and a car, and still qualify for Medi-Cal. The principle balance on your IRA is not countable. (But the income is.)

There are too many variables for each individual’s situation to be able to give advice here, but below is a short list of facts, and a link to a three page fact sheet that I’ve put together to give you a foundational knowledge. 

1.) Currently, there is a 30 month look back period. This means that even if you use a valid form of transfer (proper gifting, or an irrevocable trust), Medi-Cal will look back for 30 months and see what you did. If you wait for month 31+ to apply for Medi-Cal, this will be no big deal. But if you apply before the look back period is up, you will not qualify AND be “grounded” for a period of time. WHY? Medi-Cal is the state and federal government, which is taxpayer money, and if you have the cash assets, their thinking is, “Why does the taxpayer need to pay for your care if you can do some of it yourself?” It is assumed that the California legislature will finish passing regulations in 2019 that makes this look back period 60 months (5 years). Planning ahead is a must here.

2.) After you pass away, if your home is in a revocable living trust, Medi-Cal will not seek repayment via your home. That goes for any other asset you have that is not part of your probate estate. (Yet another good reason to form a trust if you own real property.)

3.) If you are married and your spouse needs help with long term care, your local Medi-Cal representative can help you apply. You will not be left in the cold.

Click the link above to download a fact sheet for your convenience.

Is it Okay to Add My Adult Child’s Name to My Account or Deed?

Is it okay to add one of my kids’ names to my bank account or property to avoid probate and make it easier on my family?

The answer depends upon your situation. It is frustrating that I cannot give you legal advice on this topic, but truly, without knowing your situation, I can give zero advice. 

But I can share this information, and maybe you can guess which way I would lean, regardless of your circumstances.

The Good?

You can add another person to your bank account or deed on your property in order to try and avoid probate. When you add another person, this person become a joint owner of the account. For example, you can add your son to your checking account so that he can write checks for you if you need him to, or deposit funds without a fuss from the bank, etc. When you pass away, he has access to the account immediately, making the transition seamless on his part. That can be considered the upside to adding another name on an account or deed. (You can add someone to your property as well.)

The Bad.

When you add another person to your account or property, they become a joint owner. Legally, you have equal rights to the account or property. Let’s say you add your son John to your checking account. You have a retirement check that is deposited every month, and you use this account for everything: a little savings, and paying the bills. If John gets in any kind of financial trouble, your account is now half his, and your money can be taken. The same goes if you add John to your deed. Your property can have liens put upon it against John. You also cannot just take John off of the account or property…he has to consent to it. 

The Ugly!

Many people have added children to their accounts or property without incident. A lot of the time it can work. However, a case recently came out that reminds us that things can get really ugly. Let me tell you a story about Betty, Kelli, and Tom.

Betty has two children: Kelli and Tom. She set up a trust, but be also had a separate checking account at Wells Fargo. She put Kelli’s name on the account. When Betty passed away, Tom insisted that the account was meant to go into the trust and be divided between he and Kelli. Kelli disagreed and said that the account was hers because Mom put her name on the account. A court battle ensued: brother and against sister, and vice versa. 

What did Betty actually want? It didn’t matter and couldn’t be proven, so the law came into play. Probate Code section 5302 states that there is a presumption that joint property is meant to be just that. You need clear and convincing evidence to overcome the presumption of survivorship laws that govern joint accounts. (You can read the decision HERE.)

If you add a child on a joint account, and tell them to split the money with others after you pass, they do not have any obligation to do so. They can claim it as their own. And it is completely legal.

Lesson:

When you add someone to your account or deed as a joint owner to make things easier after your passing, you may be very well on your way to opening the door to liability and fraud while you are alive, and greedy behavior after your death. Your efforts to avoid your children going to probate court may very well land them there in a protracted battle anyways.

A solid plan that is well executed is your safest bet to both protect your assets while you are living, and to help avoid family battles after you are no longer here to look after your family. Consider what a revocable living trust can do for you.